Pupil Premium

PUPIL PREMIUM REPORT 2017-18

Introduction

Our aim at PCS is to give every child access to the best possible education. For many children, being able to access high quality provision at school is not enough, as they do not have the same advantages as their peers outside of school. The Government has recognized this, and allocates each school with additional funding to help schools to help disadvantaged students.

Each student is different, and so the way we spend the Pupil Premium will change from year to year. Broadly, we use the additional funding to:

• Provide additional teaching in school, to help disadvantaged students to catch-up
• Provide additional resources, such as revision materials
• Provide additional opportunities, particularly making sure that financial issues don’t prevent students going on educational trips
• Provide equal opportunities, which may mean providing sports kits or breakfast

Schools are allocated Pupil Premium funding for any student who meets any of these criteria:

• They are currently eligible for free school meals
• They have received free school meals in the last six years
• They have been looked after by the local authority (CLA) for at least six months
• They have a parent who is in the Armed Forces.

Summary Information

Academic Year 2017/18 Total PP budget £225,540 Date of most recent PP Review July 2017
Total Number
of students
237/839 % pupils eligible for PP 28% Date for next internal review of this strategy January 2018

Barriers to success in education for PPI students at PCS:

1. Many PPI students’ attainment in KS2 tests is lower than for non-PPI students. This means that PPI students need support to catch-up with their peers when they start secondary school.

2. PPI students are more likely to have reading ages below their chronological ages than non-PPI students, which makes them less able to access the curriculum and can lead to these students falling further behind national averages.

3. Many of our PPI students would be unable to access educational visits and additional resources without support from the pupil premium.

4. A significant number of our PPI students have identified mental health issues as a significant barrier to their achievement at school.

Measure

PPI 2017

Non-PPI 2017

Diff 2017

PPI 2016

Non-PPI 2016

Diff 2016

5A*-C incl. EM (%)

22%

55%

33%

23%

58%

35%

Basics (%)

26%

57%

31%

30%

68%

38%

A8

28.72

40.57

11.85

37.86

48.52

10.66

P8

-1.09

-0.42

0.67

-0.25

+0.21

0.46

En average

3.26

4.29

1.03

4.68

5.21

0.53

Ma average

2.72

3.99

1.27

3.48

4.8

1.32

EBACC average

2.92

3.83

0.91

3.58

4.9

1.32

Open average

3.45

4.42

0.97

4.05

5.16

1.11

 Pupil Premium: Spending and Impact 2016-17

2016-17 allocated budget: £227, 500.

PP used for:

Rationale:

Summary of School’s Action:

Cost:

Impact and Evaluation:

Literacy Intervention – KS3

PPI students who start secondary school with reading ages below chronological age do not catch up to their peers without significant intervention;
Literacy is the biggest barrier to academic progress.

Students taught in small groups by teachers and HLTAs with additional training to support rapid literacy acquisition.

Reading Pen Pilot – students who are struggling with literacy use specialist pen in assessments to help access questions.

£21, 965 – Teaching

£16, 647 – Learning Support Assistants

 

£2, 000

The gap between PPI students and non-PPI students reading ages has narrowed from 20.5% to 17%.

Pass rates in the PCS Passport have increased in Years 8 and 9 for PPI students, but not in Year 7.

Students in the nurture groups had twice the number of achievement points as in the previous year, and reduced their behaviour points by 2, 000 across the year.

Evaluation:
Not all students benefit from small groups approach. Develop a differentiated model with ‘coaching’ style for more confident students who would thrive in larger classes with support.

Literacy Intervention – KS4

As above.

Students taken for targeted support with specialist teachers, enabling students to work on gaps in prior knowledge.

Students taken for off-site revision days, free of charge

£12, 249

The PPI/Non-PPI gap has narrowed by 6% from the previous year.

Average PPI grade has risen by one level in Maths and English.

Middle ability PPI students were broadly in-line with peers in Maths and English. High ability students have biggest gap.

Evaluation: the revision days had impact and are cost-effective.

Students have not all responded to targeted support in Maths and English.

Consider using alternative interventions, such as online resources and rewards for attending extra-curricular revision sessions.

Higher ability PPI students need a different approach. G+T action plan being written to identify additional strategies.

Numeracy Intervention – KS3

PPI students who are behind their peers often have gaps in their knowledge that cannot be addressed in the mainstream classroom.

Students taught in small groups by teachers and HLTAs with additional training to support rapid growth in numeracy skills.

£12, 798 – Teaching

£3, 670 – Learning Support Assistants

Rapid catch-up, with students making at least one grade progress across the year. However, students who have moved into mainstream groups have not continued to progress.

Evaluation – need to begin scaffolding move to larger groups more quickly to ease transition.

Numeracy Intervention – KS4

As above.

Students given priority access to tutoring with specialist HLTA.

Students taken for off-site revision days, free of charge

£13, 083

As for Literacy – KS4.

Revision materials, all subjects, KS4

Many non-PPI students benefit from having their own revision books at home, access to websites that require a subscription, etc. Studies suggest that having your own copy of books, source materials, etc., leads to better outcomes.

The school stocks revision guides for all subjects – PPI students receive copies for free.

 

£3, 000.

 

PPI Basics gap narrowed by 6%.

Evaluation: continue to offer. Need to look at online resources, as students move away from textbooks.

Access to Specialist Support for Speech and Language difficulties

Many students have low level speech and language difficulties that mean they do not meet the threshold for support. At PCS we employ our own Speech and Language teacher because we have a Special Facility within the school. The Pupil Premium allows us to offer this resource to PPI students.

Screening, monitoring, small group or one-to-one support.

£21, 643.

 

Additional life-skills Teaching

A number of students in our school are vulnerable socially and need more support than the mainstream curriculum offers.

Small group work that is focussed on workplace scenarios and preparation for adulthood.

£10, 610.

99% students in education, employment or training post-16.

Evaluation: successful strategy, student feedback is asking for more opportunities to meet employers and more information about apprenticeships.

Additional careers guidance

Many PPI students will not be able to gain the knowledge that comes from mixing with people who do different jobs and have different qualifications.

Extra careers guidance; priority work experience placement; access to university widening participation programmes.

£2, 000.

As above.

Attendance support

Progress at school is clearly linked to attendance. Attendance of PPI students is below attendance of non-PPI students at PCS. The reasons for this are complex and require a range of strategies.

Breakfast club

 

ESBAS support

 

Rewards

£4, 200

 

£7, 500

 

£1, 000

Attendance has remained an issue for PPI students, and is well below the school average at 92.5%. The same is true for PA.

Evaluation: During 2016-17 there has been a significant overhaul of systems for tracking and challenging attendance across the school. There is evidence that this is starting to have an impact, as attendance for PPI students was up by 0.5% for the first month of 2017-18 compared to the previous year.

However, not all of the measures were effective, and student feedback around the rewards on offer indicated that they were not valued. The attendance reward trip had a threshold of 98%, so did little to motivate students in our target range. These approaches will change in 2017-18.

Social and Emotional Support

For some PPI students deprivation is more than a financial need. Mental health and well-being is increasingly understood as a barrier to learning on a par with numeracy and literacy issues.

Nurture worker – KS3

Pastoral Support – all years

Additional Counselling – all years

Early Help Key Worker

£19, 290

£15, 000

£5, 265

 

£21, 749

PPI students had high rates of exclusion in 2015-16, above the national average and almost double the non-PPI rate. However, this dropped by 2.7% in 2016-17, and the in-school gap halved. PPI exclusions are now below national averages.

Evaluation: the combination of support and challenge has had an impact. Further improvements will be achieved through greater engagement in class. We also need to be prepared in case our attendance strategy succeeds and we have more vulnerable students present in school and our resources become stretched.

Alternative Courses

PPI students benefit from the same broad and balanced curriculum as their peers. However, in exceptional cases, where engagement with school is preventing the child from learning, we do consider vocational courses at local colleges.

Vocational qualifications – Brighton Met, PFL

£7, 900

This had a significant impact on two students, who had previously had the most exclusions in their year groups and saw a significant reduction and an increase in achievement points. The difference to these students’ self-esteem has been obvious to everyone who works with them.

Evaluation: this remains an expensive option that is not always cost-effective. In extreme cases it can be successful and have an impact on student motivation at school.

Forest Schools

One of the most significant gaps for the families of PPI students is having the time or money to take children out. Forest schools has a wealth of research behind it that shows the impact it has on students’ overall well-being and happiness at school.

All Year 7 students attend Forest School. There is no charge for PPI students.

£3, 000.

Since this has been introduced the number of achievement points vs. behaviour points in Year 7 has more than doubled.

 

Equality of Opportunity

All students should have the same experience at school, regardless of income.

Access to educational trips (including residentials), uniform, sports clubs, areas of the curriculum that carry voluntary contributions are all provided for free to PPI students.

£24, 000.

 

 Pupil Premium Strategic Plan 2017-18

2017-18 allocated budget: £225, 540.

PP used for:

Rationale:

School’s Intended Actions:

Cost:

Success Criteria:

Literacy Intervention – KS3

PPI students who start secondary school with reading ages below chronological age do not catch up to their peers without significant intervention;
Literacy is the biggest barrier to academic progress.

Introduction of ‘Drop Everything And Read’ across the school

Introduction of Accelerated Reader programme

Pastoral programme to work on gaps in literacy for all students – TA support for PPI students

Students taught in small groups by teachers and HLTAs with additional training to support rapid literacy acquisition.

£ 1, 500 to ensure PPI students have own books

 

£8, 000

 

£6, 000

 

 

£21, 965 – Teaching

£16, 647 – Learning Support Assistants

Gap to chronological reading age narrows in all years for PPI students.

Improved attendance.

% PPI students passing Passport increases.

% PPI students ‘on-track’ is within 5% of non-PPI students.

Literacy Intervention – KS4

As above.

Students taken for targeted support with specialist teachers, enabling students to work on gaps in prior knowledge.

Students taken for off-site revision days, free of charge

Students given access to online resources.

£12, 249

 

 

 

 

£1, 500.

Gap in English L4 passes has narrowed to less than 10% of non-PPI.

Numeracy Intervention – KS3

PPI students who are behind their peers often have gaps in their knowledge that cannot be addressed in the mainstream classroom.

Students taught in small groups by teachers and HLTAs with additional training to support rapid growth in numeracy skills.

£12, 798 – Teaching

£3, 670 – Learning Support Assistants

Increase in students passing PCS Passport in Maths; increase in Honours passes.

Gap between PPI and non-PPI students end of year levels is 5% or lower.

Numeracy Intervention – KS4

As above.

Students given priority access to tutoring with specialist HLTA.

Students taken for off-site revision days, free of charge

£13, 083

Gap between PPI and non-PPI students is 12% or lower.

Revision materials, all subjects, KS4

Many non-PPI students benefit from having their own revision books at home, access to websites that require a subscription, etc. Studies suggest that having your own copy of books, source materials, etc., leads to better outcomes.

The school stocks revision guides for all subjects – PPI students receive copies for free.

 

All students to be signed up to GCSE Pod, and have completed refresher training in tutor time.

£3, 000.

 

 

£1, 500.

Supports Maths and English to reach targets (Above).

PPI ATT8 increases by 2.5 points.

Access to Specialist Support for Speech and Language difficulties

Many students have low level speech and language difficulties that mean they do not meet the threshold for support. At PCS we employ our own Speech and Language teacher because we have a Special Facility within the school. The Pupil Premium allows us to offer this resource to PPI students.

Screening, monitoring, small group or one-to-one support.

£21, 643.

 

Additional life-skills Teaching

A number of students in our school are vulnerable socially and need more support than the mainstream curriculum offers.

Small group work that is focussed on workplace scenarios and preparation for adulthood.

£10, 610.

100% students in education, employment or training post-16.

Additional careers guidance

Many PPI students will not be able to gain the knowledge that comes from mixing with people who do different jobs and have different qualifications.

Extra careers guidance; priority work experience placement; access to university widening participation programmes.

£2, 000.

As above.

Attendance support

Progress at school is clearly linked to attendance. Attendance of PPI students is below attendance of non-PPI students at PCS. The reasons for this are complex and require a range of strategies.

Breakfast club

 

ESBAS support

 

Rewards for targeted PPI students who are presently between 91 and 94%.

£4, 200

 

£7, 500

 

£1, 000

Attendance for PPI students above 95%.

Social and Emotional Support

For some PPI students deprivation is more than a financial need. Mental health and well-being is increasingly understood as a barrier to learning on a par with numeracy and literacy issues.

Nurture worker – KS3

Pastoral Support – all years

Additional Counselling – all years

Early Help Key Worker

£19, 290


£15, 000

£5, 265


£21, 749

Exclusions for PPI students continue to fall and are in-line with non-PPI students.

Attendance is at 95% or higher.

Alternative Courses

PPI students benefit from the same broad and balanced curriculum as their peers. However, in exceptional cases, where engagement with school is preventing the child from learning, we do consider vocational courses at local colleges.

Vocational qualifications – Brighton Met, PFL

£5, 000

Only continued in exceptional circumstances with PA students.

Forest Schools

One of the most significant gaps for the families of PPI students is having the time or money to take children out. Forest schools has a wealth of research behind it that shows the impact it has on students’ overall well-being and happiness at school.

All Year 7 students attend Forest School. There is no charge for PPI students.

£5, 000.

Year 7 students show reduction in PPI gaps in the following areas:

  • Passport completion
  • Ratio behaviour to achievement points
  • Detentions/lateness

 

Equality of Opportunity

All students should have the same experience at school, regardless of income.

Access to educational trips (including residentials), uniform, sports clubs, areas of the curriculum that carry voluntary contributions are all provided for free to PPI students.

£24, 000.

 

Notices

Need Help?

Simply contact the school office via our telephone or email address. During term we aim to respond within 24 hours.

01273 581100
enquiries@pcs.e-sussex.sch.uk